Party Game

That's a Question!

The party game That's a Question!, takes the familiar format of challenging others with questions, then voting on what they'll say.

In more detail, each player has a hand of hexagonal cards, with words or phrases in three color blocks on the card. On a turn, you choose a player that has a token in front of them, take that token, then present them with a question by choosing one of the three question prompts (which are all color-coded), then choosing two cards from your hand and adding the properly-colored section of those cards to the question. A sample question: "What would you miss more if it ceases to exist: Facebook or doors?" That player secretly votes on A or B, while everyone else but the questioner secretly votes A or B depending on how they think the person will answer; a voter can optionally add their 3x scoring token to their vote.

Once everyone votes, you reveal the tiles. Everyone who voted correctly moves ahead one or three spaces on the scoring track, and the questioner moves ahead one space for each person who voted incorrectly. If you pass a certain space on the scoring track, you retrieve your 3x token (if you've used it). Since you can ask a question only of those with a token in front of them, everyone is asked roughly the same number of questions, and whoever has the most points after a certain number of rounds wins.

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Party Games

Two Rooms and a Boom

In Two Rooms and a Boom – a social deduction/hidden role party game for six or more players – there are two teams: the Red Team and the Blue Team. The Blue Team has a President. The Red Team has a Bomber. Players are equally distributed between two rooms (i.e., separate playing areas). The game consists of five timed rounds. At the end of each round, some players will be swapped into opposing rooms. If the Red Team's Bomber is in the same room as the President at the end of the game, then the Red Team wins; otherwise the Blue Team wins. Lying encouraged.

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Archived -- Ask Staff for Assistance

Werewords

In Werewords, players guess a secret word by asking "yes" or "no" questions. Figure out the magic word before time is up, and you win! However, one of the players is secretly a werewolf who is not only working against you, but also knows the word. If you don't guess the word in time, you can still win by identifying the werewolf!

To help you out, one player is the Seer, who knows the word but must not to be too obvious when helping you figure it out; if the word is guessed, the werewolf can pull out a win by identifying the Seer!

A free iOS/Android app provides thousands of words in hundreds of categories at various difficulty levels, so everyone can play.

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Party Games

Start Player

Game description from the publisher:

By our detailed calculations, more than 2.5 million additional games could be played each year if you took less time picking a start player. Start Player solves this problem: Just turn over a card and you'll know who the start player is. Maybe it's as simple as identifying the tallest player, or the player with the most unbuttoned buttons. It's the most comprehensive system ever devised for choosing who starts a game.

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Archived -- Ask Staff for Assistance

The Red Dragon Inn 6: Villains

Description from the publisher:

You and your wicked companions have spent the day pillaging the countryside and "dealing" with meddlesome adventurers. It's about time you kicked back with a pint at the evil equivalent of The Red Dragon Inn — The Black Dragon Depths, a nefarious tavern hidden deep in the catacombs below Greyport. No more heroes this time. Now you get to play as the bad guys!

The Red Dragon Inn 6: Villains is a standalone expansion to The Red Dragon Inn series of games. In this game, you and up to three of your friends play as evil villains celebrating the defeat of your archenemies at a wild fantasy party. You gamble, brawl, and drink the night away as you compete to be the last villain standing at the end of the night.

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Archived -- Ask Staff for Assistance

Codenames Duet

Codenames Duet keeps the basic elements of Codenames — give one-word clues to try to get someone to identify your agents among those on the table — but now you're working together as a team to find all of your agents. (Why you don't already know who your agents are is a question that Congressional investigators will get on your back about later!)

To set up play, lay out 25 word cards in a 5×5 grid. Place a key card in the holder so that each player sees one side of the card. Each player sees a 5×5 grid on the card, with nine of the squares colored green (representing your agents) and one square colored black (representing an assassin). The assassin is in different places on each side of the card, and three of the nine squares on each side are also green on the other side!

Collectively, you need to reveal all fifteen agents — without revealing either assassin or too many innocent bystanders — before time runs out in order to win the game. Either player can decide to give a one-word clue to the other player, along with a number. Whoever receives the clue places a finger on a card to identify that agent. If correct, they can attempt to identify another one. If they identify a bystander, then their guessing time ends. If they identify an assassin, you both lose! Unlike regular Codnenames, they can keep guessing as long as they keep identifying an agent each time; this is useful for going back to previous clues and finding ones they missed earlier.

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Two Player Games

Goths Save The Queen

In Goths Save The Queen, two two-player clans fight to save the Queen hidden in the middle of the table. Each clan is composed of one player giving orders (the King) and another one trying to understand which order has been given (the Warchief).

To give an order, the King chooses a card and flips it onto the table to reveal two orders on its back, with no clue as to which is the right one. The Warchief checks the battlefield, then tries to choose the right order with a card in hand. When both clans have chosen their cards, all of them are revealed, and if both cards match on a clan, then the order is carried out. Some examples of orders: loading the catapult, firing with the catapult, progressing toward the Queen, looking at hidden cards in the middle to find the Queen, and avoiding traps...

Of course, within a clan it is absolutely prohibited to make any sign or say anything to help the partner to guess which order is intended.

When playing 1-vs-1 or 1-vs-2, the game is a bit different: The single player team cannot play the same order twice, one turn after another.

With multiple copies of Goths Save The Queen, you can compete in a 3-vs-3, 3-vs-4 or 4-vs-4 format.

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Small / Card Games

Imagine

More than one thousand items from all walks of life can be guessed through the use of 61 transparent cards in Imagine, whether they're placed next to one another or superimposed. Almost everything in the world can be represented by a simplified concept — just don't speak while you're playing...

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Party Games

Roots: A Game of Inventing Words

Roots is a game of inventing words. Players combine Prefix and Suffix cards to create new words, competing for the best connection to a Subject card. Whoever delivers the best explanation for their word captures that Subject card, gaining a potential piece of their secret Win condition. But stay sharp: players can manipulate each other's progress with various Power cards, undermining opponents while advancing themselves. The result is narrative warfare in which the most creative, best spoken, and craftiest thrive.

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Card Games

Oh Captain!

Our intrepid adventurers have sailed on a journey, finding the hidden cave of a mythic monster. There are so many strange things there! The Captain allows the crew to search through the place and bring back to him what they have found, but by bluffing the Captain, they will try to keep the best part of the loot for themselves...

In Oh Captain!, an asymmetric game of changing roles, an adventurer must offer the loot cards they draw to the Captain, telling the Captain something about what the cards contain but not necessarily speaking truthfully. Indeed, some cursed objects can't be spoken of at all by the adventurers.

The Captain, who is safe from being attacked by objects, decides whether the crew member can keep the loot or not, and if the Captain turns down the offer, the crew member can decide to use an object against another adventurer. The latter player can overcome this by calling out a lie, winning or losing a coin based on who is right. The role of the Captain can be claimed by any adventurer who is richer than the Captain, and in the end the richest adventurer wins the game.

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Party Games

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